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Deliver Kindness

Dec 19, 2018


“We’ve all got to know that the stuff coming or going in the mail isn’t everything—it’s about the connection. We buy Christmas gifts for connection, we send cards for connection, so let’s connect a little more with all the people who make that possible.”

Each Christmas, we give everyone who works at our local post office a little gift (usually alcohol related because let’s be honest, by New Year’s they deserve a drink—and always under $20 because that’s the USPS tipping policy for accepting gifts). The last two years we gave Amazon gift cards to our UPS drivers because they delivered all of our Amazon orders. They had a laugh.
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But this year, it’s been different. 
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Maybe you haven’t noticed, but the USPS is delivering most of the Amazon packages you order. It’s increased their volume in a way that is–in my opinion—borderline crazy. Since I’m shipping and receiving packages daily, I think often about how this affects my local post office, especially every Monday (extra pallets, yes I said PALLETS, of packages are waiting for them when they go into work) and on days like today after a national holiday, I can’t even imagine. 
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Also, our UPS and FedEX drivers have been different every day, so how could I thank them for this year? 
Then Shane and I saw this idea online last week. Maybe you’ve seen a version of this too? 
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It really got me thinking about my Grandma who would invite her mailman in (I think his name was Rick) into her house for a blueberry muffin and some orange juice on his mail route. She was proud of this, because Rick told her several times that it was against USPS policy to go into a house for a break, but that’s how hard she insisted. Plus, her blueberry muffins were break-the-law-kinda-good.

They are both passed on now and this was back some forty years ago, so don’t go alerting the Harrisburg Post Office of this crime or anything, but my point is: she realized if he was delivering mail all morning and afternoon that he didn’t have a proper meal—if any—during the day. Moreover, it was surprising to her that she was the only person on his route that ever insisted on extending him that kindness.

I don’t know how many times Rick came into my grandparent’s house on a really hot or really cold day to have a muffin and orange juice, but as long as Rick was working that route my grandma always had the juice and muffins on standby. 
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So maybe you don’t have an online business or order lots of packages this time of year, and maybe you aren’t home all day to offer muffins and juice, but there’s something more you can do:

Be a little kinder—We’ve ALL got at least one package that seems “lost” in tracking right now and is WAY past the date it was supposed to be here. Be patient. It’s not just you, and those carriers do care.

Ask your UPS, FedEX, or USPS delivery person their name when you see them next. I can’t believe I once lived in a place where I didn’t know the name of the person bringing me gifts.

Leave a Christmas card in your mailbox this year for your local mail carrier thanking them, you don’t have to include anything with it—but if you want to they can accept gifts up to $20. {Or you can take a cue from my rule-breaking-grandma and give whatever you want.}
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We’ve all got to know that the stuff coming or going in the mail isn’t everything—it’s about the connection. We buy Christmas gifts for connection, we send cards for connection, so let’s connect a little more with all the people who make that possible.

P.S. My local mail carrier gave me a big hug when she saw this sign and these treats! The UPS guy said thank you like eight times before he left with a protein bar and added, “I’ve seen a few people do this, this is really nice.”

Kindness matters. Pass it on however you can.

Xoxo
Tessa
TessaShaffer.com